info@MyBrotherFromAnotherMother.org

 

Cover for How to Talk

Download your FREE copy.

How to talk to just about anyone about Israel-Palestine: First Steps Toward Meaningful Dialogue

by Joyce Schriebman and Yehezkel Landau

As a participant or a facilitator, you’ll find tools in this guide to help turn apprehensive encounters into fruitful conversations.

How to talk to just about anyone about Israel-Palestine shows how to hear and be heard. How to create productive discussions instead of contentious arguments.

This 20-page guide is filled with step-by-step guidelines for increasing opportunities to have meaningful conversations about Israel-Palestine.

DISCOVER

  • 5 action-steps that build trust and foster communication
  • Recognize the difference between dialogue and debate
  • The differences between facts, opinions, narratives and truth

Download the guide for FREE. Simply sign-up to receive information from My Brother from Another Mother and the
guide is yours! Read more…

Download Guide Now


Table Talk Journal

I’ve wanted to do this for a long time. I spoke to Eman last fall about setting up a public space for Jewish-Muslim conversation. But we couldn’t find time in our schedules to dedicate to regular sessions… Continue Reading >>


Recent Posts

Commencement: Celebration not Controversy

June 2, 2017

It’s hard to argue with a person who’s promoting free speech. But that’s what I’m about to do. In his What in the World broadcast, Liberals think they’re tolerant, but they’re not, CNN commentator Fareed Zakaria claims that students who protest at graduation ceremonies demonstrate “an attitude of self-righteousness that says we are so pure, we’re […]

Read More>>

Now That's Different Video

Meet my dad: The Republican who’s hosting Muslim refugees
June 2017

“My parents are no bleeding-heart liberals. You will not find them protesting at Dulles. They did not vote for Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama or Bill Clinton. But they are Christians, and they love the United States. And for them, that has always meant welcoming the lonely, the homeless, the foreigner. I can scarcely remember a time growing up when we did not have a cousin or a friend of a friend or a complete stranger living in the guest room…“I’m not one that dismisses the fears of my fellow countrymen,” my dad told me when I asked why he decided to welcome the Ibrahimis into his home. “But closing our doors to migrants and refugees is not the answer.” Read more…